Yule Candle (Spell Saturday #38)

This is called a Yule Candle. It’s a strictly holiday based spell. Traditionally, it’s lit during dinner on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day but this is kind of one of those traditions that’s not based in any particular religion so you an easily adopt it to your own traditions.  So this can be lit during your designated big  winter holiday meal.

 

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This is pretty much the easiest candle spell you’ll ever see. Everything is optional. The colors are up to you. It’s comes down to one, singular rule: Light the candle before you sit down to eat and don’t let it go out until you’re done eating. That’s it. That’s the spell.

Following the Yule Candle rule will allow you to avoid bad luck. It’s a pretty adaptable spell so you can do what you like but this spell will combine blessings, safety, prosperity, good luck, and security (enough food, enough rent money, job security, etc.).

I lit mine during my family’s Christmas Day brunch but sometimes I’ll also light it if we don’t go out for dinner on Christmas Eve. Depends on what we’re doing that year. (For reference, my family does a secular gift exchange on Christmas. Religion’s checked at the door for us.) Typically this is lit and left on the table among the family but I like to leave it off to the side or even in the kitchen (within sight of the table) so it doesn’t get knocked over.

Shh. This is a fledgling money spell in a teeny tiny cauldron. Let's let it work its magic.

A post shared by Samantha Davidson (@thiscrookedcrown) on

What you’ll need:

  • A candle that can last the length of your meal, any color
  • Sturdy, stable candle holder appropriate for the candle size
  • Cinnamon, powdered
  • Clover, diced
  • Clove, powdered
  • Nutmeg, powdered
  • Sage, powdered
  • Rosemary, diced
  • Thyme, diced
  • Ginger, powdered
  • Lavender, crushed and crumbled
  • Rose petals, crumbled
  • Pine needles (optional)
  • Drawing oil or flame

 

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Mix your herbs together and spread them out on a plate. Get your candle and make sure to remove any labels for it. You may wish to rough up the sides a bit too with a knife or your fingernails to make the herbs stick better but that’s optional

Coat your candle in drawing oil. You can even use something like vegetable oil or olive oil if you don’t have a designated drawing oil. While the candle is still oily and wet, roll it in the herbs, coating all the sides.

Alternatively, if you want to skip the oil, slowly and carefully heat the sides of the candle up and roll the hot wax in the herbs. This techniques requires more patience and a severe eye for fire safety so you don’t burn yourself but the herbs literally become the candle.

A third option is to melt the candle down, add in the herbs to the melted wax, and pour the wax into a fireproof container or candle mold. Make sure to include the wick and check to see if your newly made candle can fit in any candle holder you own.

Once your candle is dressed, store it in a sunny window or in your kitchen until it’s time for your big holiday meal. Right as people are getting ready to sit down and eat, light the candle. You don’t need to say anything but you can if you wish.

Let the candle burn throughout your entire meal and when everyone has left the table, blow it out. You can discard the candle alongside your meal or holiday decorations or you can save it until next year, using the leftovers to forge a new candle.

Notes:

  • Pillars, tapers, and jar candles are really good for this spell. Large pillars can even be stored in a box or bag and used annually.You can use votive candles, as shown, if your meal isn’t going to be a huge affair.
  • The herb choices here will be largely personal. I have orange zest, ginger peel, and hydrangea petals in my mix for personal reasons. Go with your instincts here. Add dried florals or herbs from your garden or pick a dried herb that screams your holiday to you.
  • Pine needles are included here under the assumption you’re using a holiday tree. If you’re not, skip it.
  • When you blow out the candle will depend on your family. For example, my family doesn’t serve dessert at the main meal – we eat it hours later. But we do sit down and play games after we clear the table from dishes. While we’re clearing the table of dishes, I blow the candle out. Your family’s probably different so trust your instincts here.

Happy casting!

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